What Can Happen When You Try to Save Money On Accounting

Here’s what might happen when you try to save money by not hiring professional accountants for your small business.

Running a small business can be tough, and cost-cutting is one of the most common and difficult challenges that a small business owner will have to sooner or later deal with. Small businesses have to work within a limited budget and do not have the luxury of huge conglomerates with deep pockets. It can be very tempting to cut costs wherever possible, and professional accounting services may seem like an unnecessary expense.

Trying to do your own accounting or hiring the cheapest accountant in the market may seem like a good idea when you want to save money, but these tactics can backfire. Here are a few things that can possibly happen when you try to skimp on accounting.

You lose the peace of mind of working with a professional

It is understandable that you want to save money wherever possible and invest everything into the actual running of the business, but when it comes to getting an accountant, remember that you basically get what you pay for. Inexperienced and unqualified accountants tend to be cheap, so you may definitely save some money, but you will not have the same peace of mind that you would get from working with a seasoned professional. An experienced accountant who charges a higher fee may be able to work faster, and in the long run may even cost less.

Your bookkeeping suffers

If one of your employees has basic knowledge in accounting, you may think that it’s smart to put them in charge of bookkeeping. But the thing is, many in-house bookkeepers are clueless about what they’re doing. They may classify items incorrectly, used in appropriate headings, and may not be up-to-date on the latest accounting practices. At the time of tax filing, your accountant will end up charging you for correcting these mistakes and you may even include greater expenses in terms of both time and money to get the books in order.

You make unnecessary mistakes by doing it all on your own

Just to eliminate the expense of hiring an accountant, some business owners try and do everything on their own. You simply cannot keep books by throwing all your receipts into a shoebox. This often leads to the same disastrous consequences as having an inexperienced in-house bookkeeper. Not only that, when you do your own accounting, you may be unable to spend enough time on your core business.

You tend to leave it to the last minute

When you don’t have a professional accountant working for you, you may start going through and organizing your paperwork only at the last possible minute. When you let your paperwork get piled up like this, things can easily get lost, and you will also get so overwhelmed that you may simply give up.

By allocating a small budget for professional accounting, you will be able to keep your finances in order and also find enough time to take care of what really matters - running your business.

Related Posts:

Posted in Small Business | Tagged , | Leave a comment

How Small Businesses Can Compete With the Big Companies

Today, it is easier than before to compete with big businesses. Here are some tips to help you win the battle against Goliath.

Granted, big companies have deep pockets and elaborate supply chains that give them quite an edge over smaller players. But as a small business owner, you need not throw your hands up in despair and give up. Whether you are a service provider or a manufacturing company, here are a few ways for small businesses to effectively compete with the big boys on their own turf.

DILIGENTLY GATHER INTELLIGENCE ABOUT YOUR COMPETITION

The websites of many big companies have a lot of revealing information about the business which can be of significant benefit to small businesses who aspire to learn from them. Shortlist a few websites that you want to keep an eye on, and check them every so often to find out if there are any changes. Encourage your employees to listen to the real-world chatter about your product as they interact with other people outside the company. This may help you discover a problem that no one else in the industry is addressing, or help you come by critical competitive intelligence that will give you an edge.

DO SOMETHING NO ONE ELSE IS DOING

With the help of the product and market intelligence that you collect, see if you can do something that no one else in the industry has done so far. This is what JayBird, an earbuds manufacturing start-up, did to attract a large chunk of customers. They offered earbuds that repel sweat and a lifetime guarantee against sweat damage. This was a huge hit among their target demographic of sporty customers.

PUT YOUR CUSTOMER FIRST

For a large company, a customer is just one among tens and thousands of others. As a small business, it is easier for you to really reach out and care for your customer. Focus on building personal relationship with your customers and effectively meeting their specific needs and desires.

CUSTOMIZED SOLUTIONS

A small business is in a unique position to offer tailor-made solutions to their customers. Be flexible in your approach and move away from a one size fits all solution.

Speed of communication In a small business, the decision-making process and hierarchy are likely to be much simpler than they are in a large firm. Since there are much less administrative hassles, it is easier to provide a faster response to customer queries or issue. Build a reputation for fast and personalized customer care, and you will soon build a loyal base of customers.

CHARGE LESS

Small businesses typically have low overheads than the larger ones. This should ideally allow you to offer quality services at a lesser price than what a large company would be able to. You don’t have to sell yourself short; just bring your prices to a level where it attracts new customers and allows you to function without running into losses.

USE THE INTERNET

The Internet has come as a boon for small businesses who do not have the money to spend on color page advertisements or television ads. You can use digital marketing to your advantage. Reach out to your customers through your websites and social networks. The connections that you build online and the information that you gather can give you a distinct advantage over your competition.

Small businesses, precisely because they are small, have the ability to be nimble and quick because they are not bogged down by several layers of administration and protocol. This, combined with deep knowledge about your competition, can help you compete effectively with larger firms.

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting, Small Business | Tagged | Leave a comment

Book Keeping Basics for a Small Business

Many small businesses and start-ups are second to none when it comes to producing great products and building a strong presence in the market. However, the same thing cannot often be said about their bookkeeping practices.

Why you need to keep your books?

Bookkeeping is just a way to keep track of your income and expenses, which consequently
improves your chances of making a profit. It also helps you collect and organize all the
financial information that is necessary to file various tax returns appropriately and on time. Obviously, it also enables the IRS to evaluate your operations.

You don’t have to be a qualified accountant to do basic keeping. Here are a few
bookkeeping basics to help you maintain proper financial paperwork for your small
business.

As long as you have adequate records that reflect the income and expenses of your
business, you can keep them in any way that you like. Depending on how big your business is, you can either maintain your books on your own ledgers or use an accounting software.
There are three basic steps to keeping your books

  • Keeping receipts of every payment and expenditure
  • Daily, weekly, or monthly summary of your income and expenditure records
  • Creating basic financial reports that provide key pieces of information about the business

Keeping your receipts

Every purchase and expenditure of your business must be backed by a record of receipt
which lists out the amount, date, and other relevant information. You can either keep all
your receipts in a shoe box, or record it in a software system. Choose a method that suits
your needs. If your business is very small, you may just need to collect all your receipts in a box file and not splurge on other complex filing systems.

Summary of revenues and expenditure

You must maintain a periodic summary of income, expenditure, and other financial
information that you are keeping track of. These summaries are later used to create specific financial information about your business.

Make it a habit to post to the ledger on a regular basis, say daily, every Friday, or at least
once a month. Post the receipts by entering the amount indicated in the physical record into the ledger. This is called ‘posting to the ledger’. Your posting schedule depends on the number and frequency of your sales and expenditures, and how detailed you want to keep your books. A busy business may want to use a cash register and post daily sales, while a smaller business can get by with a weekly or even monthly posting. There are accounting software programs which will generate its own ledgers when you enter relevant information.

Creating basic financial reports

Financial reports are key because they reveal key aspects of the financial health of your
business. You may have an income ledger which tells you that your business brought in a lot of money, but unless you measure it against your actual expenses you wouldn’t know
whether you made a profit or loss. This is why you need financial reports which combine
crucial data from multiple ledgers to give you an overall view of what is happening in your business. The basic reports that you need to create on a regular basis or cash flow analysis, profit and loss statement, and balance sheet. Using a software makes it easy to generate these reports.

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting, Small Business | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What Does it Take to be a Certified Tax Accountant (CPA)?

8169560070_290a4e1fc4_bTax accounting is a specialty in the field of accounting, one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job opportunities for accountants are projected to grow at 13% from 2012 to 2020. Certified tax accountants advise clients on their tax liabilities. Accountants choosing this specialty can expect to earn a yearly salary of $50,000, even in the first year of their job. Becoming a certified CPA is a smart move to bring home a good pay package, and to enjoy job security. Here is what you need to do to become a certified tax accountant.

Educational Requirements
A tax accountant must have the basic qualification of a bachelor’s degree in accounting or business. To improve your chances of employment, go on to complete your Master’s degree in business administration or accounting. You will need a four year accounting degree, and also take the certification exam. Most tax accountants who do well are Certified Public Accountants who have a Master’s degree.

You must pass the CPA exam to become a licensed professional. You may practice tax accounting without being a CPA, but most tax accountants go through this licensing process. The exam is tough and requires serious preparation. The test is conducted by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Check out the AICPA website for more information on the exam and how to prepare for licensure.

Skills Needed to Become a Proficient Accountant
Accountancy is all about number crunching, so it goes without saying that you should have a natural aptitude and affinity towards numbers. With a general understanding of how numbers work, and excellent skills for communicating to your clients what the figures mean, you will be able to make your mark in the field. Tax accountants must also be very detail oriented and pay attention to minutiae. Dropping even a single number or a decimal place can have serious consequences during tax preparations.

Accountants will be required to work on sophisticated accounting software, so it is essential that you be comfortable with computers. More than all the technical capabilities, a good tax accountant must also have the ability and willingness to communicate effectively with clients who are seeking help. You must also ethically uphold all the tax regulations applicable.

What do Tax Accountants Do?
Tax accountants offer specialized tax advice to both individuals and businesses. As a tax accountant, you will be involved with calculating tax liabilities of your clients and figuring out ways for them to reduce their taxable amount. You would also complete tax forms to ensure filing on-time. Business tax accountants would be involved with higher-level strategic and financial decisions of the organization, such as what type of investments should a company make, where they should build new facilities etc.

Tax accountancy is a field with a lot of growth opportunities. It is easy for tax accountants to find a job in law firms, government agencies, and accounting firms. You may also choose to work as an independent contractor if you want to have some flexibility in the workplace. Tax accountants typically make more than other accountants, so it is an excellent specialization option to consider.

Related Posts:

Posted in CPA/Accounting | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

5 Small Business Accounting Mistakes that May be Costing You Money

Head in HandsDuring the early years of operation, many small business owners make easily avoidable bookkeeping mistakes which end up costing them money. These simple mistakes are often made because of lack of awareness about proper accounting procedures.

A typical small business owner has no time or inclination to an expert accountant, but he
can still take the necessary steps to avoid a few key pitfalls which may negatively impact the company’s bottom line. The following are some of the accounting mistakes that a small business owner must try and avoid.

Mistake 1: Not hiring a professional
Small business owners are often short on cash, so it is no surprise that they try to do everything on their own. But the truth is, not hiring a professional to do your taxes or bookkeeping can cost you big money down the road. An experienced professional can help you take advantage of the ever changing tax laws and also plan ahead for potential changes. The accuracy of your financial paperwork also has a significant impact on the success of your small business.

Mistake 2: Not keeping track of receivables
You may be doing a lot of business, but if you’re not getting reimbursed within a reasonable timeframe, the business might soon be run into ground. When you sell a product, you issue an invoice and record a receivable. When the customer pays you money, it is recorded as receivable paid against the invoice. Many business owners usually leave the customer payments to be reconciled at a later date, and come tax time they are left with a bunch of payment receipts and a receivables report that makes no sense.

Follow up on your receivables and mark payments against invoices regularly to save yourself time and money. Consider using online payment and cloud accounting services to automate your receivables process.

Mistake 3: Not keeping receipts for small purchases
You may be keeping the receipts for all major purchases, but are you doing the same for small purchases as well? It might not seem like big deal if a couple of cab fare receipts are missing, but these things can add up. Also, you really don’t want to be in a position where you are unable to show proof for expenses claimed in your tax return. Make sure that you have the proof to back up every penny that you claim as expense.

Mistake 4: Not hiring full-time employees
Hiring full-time employees is definitely a more money intensive exercise than hiring independent contractors. But if all your employees are independent contractors, you may have to schedule your work around their availability and how much work they are willing to take up. You have to file Form 1099-MISC if you pay independent contractors. If the IRS decides that you have incorrectly classified an employee as an independent contractor, you may attract penalties.

Mistake 5: Not keeping your books current
The first few years of any business can be a mad rush, but if you neglect to keep your books current it will only worsen the situation. If you’re unable to keep proper records, then it is a clear indication that you need to hire an accountant. An experienced professional can catch costly errors right at the beginning, and help the business operations run more smoothly and efficiently.

These accounting mistakes can happen to anybody, but if you’re aware of it and prepare accordingly, you will be able to maximize the efficiency and profitability of your small business.

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting, CPA/Accounting | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

How Working With a Professional Accountant Can Benefit Your Company

Every business, regardless of what size it is, needs a professional accountant who will
provide valuable financial advice throughout the year, helps file taxes and other paperwork, and even play the role of a business advisor or consultant.

Many small firms feel that they don’t really need an accountant, or that they cannot afford
one. Some others also mistakenly assume that all that accountants do is just fill up a few
forms at the end of the year. The truth is, a qualified Certified Public Accountant (CPA) can not only help you with filing taxes, but also save money in the long run.

Here are some of the ways in which working with a professional accountant can benefit your company.

Pay just the right amount in taxes
Filing taxes is not just about filling up forms. Not only do you have to complete the forms
accurately, but you must do it in a way that minimizes your tax bill. A good professional
accountant will help you understand the different legal ways in which you can minimize
your tax bill. The tax planning service offered by accountants is one of the biggest benefits
you can gain from them. The accountant will help you take advantage of the tax laws and
also offer advice throughout the year to operate the business in a way that gives you the
best tax advantages. It’s like having your own personal financial advisor throughout the
year.

Save time
Your proficiency lies in running your business, not navigating tax laws. If you spend your
valuable time working on your company’s financial accounts, you’re taking that time away
from your business – time that you could spend to earn more money. Forget the opportunity cost, working through your accounts as a non-expert may even cost you more money because you may miss certain things that would be glaringly obvious to an experienced professional accountant.

Grow the business
For any business to grow in the right direction, you need to take strategic business and
financial decisions. Especially in the early stages of business, you need to be particularly
careful about making the right decisions. Good accountants will work with you closely and help your business succeed. They can also draw on their experience and suggest solutions to your business and financial problems. Since accountants usually have close contact with other professionals such as lawyers, bankers etc. they can put you in touch with them to sort out issues that are beyond their scope.

File all the paperwork accurately and on time
If you send in paperwork with incorrect or incomplete details, you may be asked to submit it again with the correct details. If you miss a deadline for filing your tax returns or other important documentation, you may attract a fine. You really do not want your forms to be sent to a tax inspector who will go through it with a fine tooth comb. You can avoid all this by using the services of an accountant who will ensure that the right forms will be completed accurately, and will be filed at the right time.

A good accountant may cost you money, sure, but can you really afford not to have one?

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting, CPA/Accounting | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Tips for Small Business Tax Planning

Many small business owners find the current tax system challenging, and that owning a
business is sometimes more expensive than being paid a salary as an employee. But with proper tax planning, small business owners can have a hassle-free experience when
they file their yearly or quarterly taxes. Here are a few tax planning tips for small businesses to set themselves up to be in the best possible position for next year’s taxes.

Maintain excellent records on a daily basis
It is very important to keep track of all the cash that you bring in and all the cash that you
spend. Maintain your records from the very first day of starting a business. There are many good accounting software programs that are available to keep track of all your transactions. Keep all receipts and invoices of business operations and expenses. Ensure that the receipts and invoices match the entries in the accounting program. Do this, and you will no longer dread the year-end tax time.

Hire a qualified accountant
Hire a Certified Professional Accountant who will offer valuable financial advice on how to plan your taxes, and also take care of the actual filing of paperwork. Remember that

inaccurate or inappropriate filing of taxes can attract stiff penalties and unwanted attention from the taxman. As a small business owner, you may not have the time or expertise to dig through your company’s accounts. A qualified professional can make your life easy when it comes to tax planning.

Take advantage of all business expenses and tax deductions
Businesses can deduct a wide variety of expenses such as rent, advertising, travel, software, commissions, etc. In order to be considered deductible, a business expense must be both ordinary and necessary. There are many deductions that are available to you which you may not know about. Take some time to research different types of deductions that are allowed for small businesses, such as home office deductions, automobile deductions, entertainment expense deductions etc. Your CPA will be able to help you identify these expenses. Maintain records for all of these.

Check if there are any business tax credits that are available to you
As a small business owner, a business tax credit can be quite valuable to you. For example, if you offer insurance to your employees, you may be eligible for tax credit for up to as much as 50% of the premiums that you pay. There is also the work opportunity credit if you hire individuals from a certain groups with high levels of unemployment. Work with your CPA to find out all the tax credit opportunities that are available to you.

Classify your business appropriately
Different types of businesses attract different tax liabilities and rates. Do some research to decide which type of business entity is the best option for you. Sole proprietorship, Limited Liability Corporation, partnership, C Corporation, S Corporation etc. are some of the options.

Buy assets to save on taxes
Whenever you buy new software, furniture, technology, or equipment for your small
business, keep detailed records and save all the receipts in order to claim expenses on your tax return. Section 179 of the IRS code helps small businesses by allowing them to deduct for depreciation in one year rather than over several years. Tech assets purchases can be written off up to $250,000. There might be several assets in your company that are eligible for a section 179 deduction. Use them to your advantage.

Make sure that all your records are up-to-date and accurate so that you can minimize your tax bill. You can learn more about tax planning for your small business from the IRS website.

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting, Taxes | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Types of Business Exit Strategies

11224714194_c013df75fcYou may have built yourself a great business, but there will come a time when you no longer want to continue doing it, either due to personal reasons or to adapt to changing economic conditions. This is an inevitable eventuality for any business and therefore it is wise to have an exit strategy in place to ensure that you can leave the business smoothly.

Here are some of the common exit strategies that entrepreneurs usually employ.

IPO

An IPO or initial public offering is a way to sell shares of stock of your privately owned business to the general public. This is a lucrative way of exiting a business, because it can bring in large amounts of cash within a short time. However, bear in mind that going the IPO route is rare for most companies. Out of millions of businesses in the US, only 222 companies went public in 2013. Not only that, the expenses of going public can even run into six or seven figures.

Liquidation

There aren’t many people who start a business with the aim to liquidate it someday, but liquidation is something that happens all the time. Businesses that are struggling often choose to liquidate their assets. When a business liquidates, the prices of all its inventories are marked down to ensure a quicker sale. Liquidation proceedings are first used to repay all creditors, and whatever is left over is divided among shareholders.

Merger or acquisition

It is the dream of many start-up companies to be acquired by one of the big boys in business. A merger or acquisition indicates that the business owner sells his controlling interest in the business to the buying company. The original owner may still be involved in the day-to-day operations, usually according to the terms that are decided during the merger or acquisition process. If you find a buying company for which your business provides critical capabilities, you may have found yourself a good acquirer. The bad side of acquisition is that the original owner may feel powerless in the face of business decisions of the new management, which he feels are not in the best interests of the company.

Sell to a friendly buyer

Friendly sales often happen in family businesses to pass on the operations from one family member to another. Interested parties may also include friends and acquaintances, or even employees and customers. If you sell your business to a friendly buyer, you go out with the satisfaction that the business will be run more or less in a way that is agreeable to you and does not seek to obliterate your legacy.

Lifestyle company exit

Most lifestyle businesses function to maximize the profit of the owner without any clear plan for future growth or expansion. This is a rather straightforward way to exit the business. You keep the business expenses low, and pocket all the profits rather than put it back to the business to help it grow. Such businesses are usually very small in scale, and the owner typically dissolves the company when it is no longer profitable to run it.

Whatever your preferred exit strategy is, it is a good idea to give it some serious thought early on in the venture. It will help you provide the right direction to the business.

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Small Business Accounting for Our Local Community

business chart showing success

An accountant is not just someone whom you call to file your taxes, he can also provide valuable financial counsel throughout the year. An experienced accountant helps keep your business in the pink of financial health, build value, and stay away from dangerous practices. No matter how small your business is, you will need the help of a CPA sooner or later. In fact, for small and medium-sized businesses, the CPA even plays the role of a consultant or business advisor.

Here are a few tips to help you find the most suitable number cruncher for your small business.

Figure out what your needs are

The size and scale of your business will determine the kind of assistance that you will need from a CPA. A small business may not need the full suite of services that are offered by large accounting firms. As a small business owner, your needs may be best served by a small group of accountants. CPAs also offer customized services that serve different industries and business sizes. Do you want an experienced practitioner to review your financials every month, or just someone to deal with tax returns and financial statements at the end of the year? You must understand exactly what you need, so that you can find the right fit for your business.

Reference sources

One of the best ways to find a trusted CPA is through referrals. Ask your professional associates and other local businesses to suggest someone. Of course you can look up accountants online or in the Yellow Pages, but reviews from trusted associates will help you find the best person. Attend local business events that are hosted by your Small Business Development Center or local Chamber of Commerce. The state accounting society is also a good resource to find CPAs. The AICPA also maintains a listing of CPAs that have specialized credentials.

Interview several candidates

Shortlist a few candidates which you find through the above step. Once you have a list of potential accountants, schedule a free initial consultation and meet with each one to understand if they are a good fit for your organization. A good accountant speaks a language that you understand, regardless of what their qualifications are. Ask about the services that they offer, fees, and other similar small businesses that they deal with.

Some questions that you want to ask:

  • What is your experience with small businesses, and my industry in particular?
  • Do you offer services other than just tax preparation? Do you provide advice on budgeting, forecasting, risk assessment, business valuation, and start-up advice?
  • Who is the person that I will be in touch with and what will be the mode of communication?
  • How quickly will you respond to my queries and requests? Are you willing to visit business premises for reviews?
  • What are your professional qualifications and licenses?

To make the most of an accountant’s services, you need to know exactly what you want from them. Understand your needs upfront and ask them as many questions as needed. If you suspect that your accountant is making tall claims, contact your state’s Board of Accountancy.

Before making a final selection, make sure that your preferred accountant is qualified and have sufficient expertise and experience to look after your affairs. Confirm that they have access to specialized advisors if you need them at a later stage. An ideal accountant will provide proactive service, and work closely with you throughout the year. Insist on a fixed fee arrangement so that you don’t get any nasty surprises when they send the invoice at the end of the year.

Related Posts:

Posted in Business Consulting, CPA/Accounting | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

IRS Standard Deductions

A standard deduction is the dollar amount by which your taxable income is reduced. The amount of standard deduction is linked to inflation and can change from year to year.

Standard deductions also depend on the filing status of the taxpayer. There are five filing statuses on a federal tax return – single, married filing jointly, married filing separately, head of household, and qualifying widow(er) with dependent child. If more than one filing status applies to you, you are free to choose the one that results in the lowest amount of tax. The IRS can help you find out your filing status online.

 

How much is your standard deduction?

Here are your applicable standard deduction rates for tax year 2013, depending on your filing status.

For taxpayers younger than 65
Filing Status Standard deduction for tax year 2013
Married taxpayers filing jointly $ 12,200
Head of household $ 8,950
Single $ 6,100
Married taxpayers filing separate $ 6100
Qualifying widow or widower $ 12,200

 

For taxpayers older than 65 or are visually impaired
Filing Status Standard deduction for tax year 2013
Married taxpayers filing jointly From $ 13,400 to $ 17,000
Head of household From $ 10,450 to $ 11,950
Single From $ 7600 to $ 9,100
Married taxpayers filing separate From $ 7300 to $ 8,500
Qualifying widow or widower From $ 13,400 to $ 14,600

 

The standard deduction amounts of older, visually impaired taxpayers are noted via checkboxes on Form 1040 and Form 1040A. Depending on the age and vision of the individual, or each spouse, the standard deduction amount will vary. A couple who are both above 65 years of age and are both blind can check up to 4 boxes and get the maximum standard deduction of $ 17,000.

The IRS offers you an online facility to calculate your standard deduction amount.

Standard deduction is beneficial to you if the amount is more than the total of your allowable itemized deductions. IRS allows itemized deductions on medical expenses, mortgage loan interest, home equity loan interest, charitable contribution, casualty losses, miscellaneous expenses, business travel and entertainment expenses, education, and business use of home and car.

 

Persons who are not eligible for standard deduction

Opt for standard deduction if it is more than the total amount of your allowable itemized deductions. Some of you may not be eligible for standard deduction. You should itemize allowable deductions, and not claim standard deduction if:

  • your spouse itemizes deductions, and your filing status is married filing separately
  • because of the change in your annual accounting period, you are filing a return for a short tax year
  • your resident status is nonresident or dual status for the year. You are considered a dual status alien if during the year you were both a nonresident and resident alien.

 

A nonresident alien married to a resident alien or a US citizen during the year can be treated as a US resident according to publication 519. In this case, you are eligible for the standard deduction.

Related Posts:

Posted in Taxes | Tagged , | Leave a comment